Favorites

All posts by Donald Scarinci

Pontius Pilate

Prutah of Pontius Pilate

Many of the Roman prefects of the province of Judea issued their own coinage. Because of his connection to Jesus Christ, the prutah of Pontius Pilot are among the most coveted. Pilate’s Rule Over Judea Pontius Pilate was the Roman prefect (or governor) of Judaea

Tiberius

Denarius of Tiberius

The Denarius of the Emperor Tiberius, commonly referred to as the “Tribute Penny,” was referenced by Jesus Christ in the Bible. As written in Mark 12:17, Jesus referenced the denarius when asked about paying taxes to the Romans. He held up the coin and said: “render unto Caesar

Sulla

Sulla Silver Denarius

Lucius Cornelius Sulla, often referred to simply as “Sulla,” has the honor of being the first living person depicted on Roman coin. Sulla also played a significant role in the fall of the Roman Republic and the rise of its empire under Julius Caesar. The

Carthage

The Hannibal Coin from Carthage

Unlike other ancient civilizations, little remains of Carthage. There are few works of art, literature, or architecture to tell the story of the Carthaginians.  Some coins exist, although they are expensive when they come up for auction. Coins bearing a horse or local flora and

Alexander the Great Tetradrachm

Under Alexander the Great, the silver tetradrachm was the most widely-circulated coin. As Alexander built his empire, it was used to pay tribute, as well as mercenaries. After Alexander’s death, the kingdoms that had been under his rule continued to mint the coins bearing his

Athenian Tetradrachm

Athenian Tetradrachm

During the second half of the fifth century, the abundant silver mines of nearby Laurium allowed Athens to produce millions of tetradrachms. The silver coins helped fund the Golden Age of Athens, during which the military, politics, and culture of the ancient Greek civilization flourished.  Golden

Macedon Gold Stater of Phillip II

Macedon Gold Stater of Phillip II

Philip II ruled the Kingdom of Macedon from 359-336 B.C. Though far less well-known than his son, Alexander the Great, King Phillip started the expansion of the Macedonian Kingdom into an empire. He is also remembered for his gold Staters, although most are thought to

Achaemenid Empire

Darics of Persia’s Achaemenid Empire

A silver or gold coin that might have circulated to pay for troops and supplies during the first Persian invasion of Greece between 492 BC and 490BC represents this important period of the history of western civilization. The invasion ended in failure for the Persians

Gold Stater of Croesus

The gold Stater of Croesus was the world’s first gold coin. It features a bull and a lion facing one another. Art was now used to adorn the surface of coins to identify the coin with the coin producer. Lydia’s King Croesus King Croesus reigned

Lydian Striated Stater

The Lydian striated Stater is the first attempt in western civilization at assigning value to small pieces of metal in order to facilitate trade. These small electrum (a mixture of gold and silver) coins are the first “coins” made around 660 BC. Within 60 years,